Monthly Archives: November 2018

Meeting the Needs of Students, Employers and Institutions

Colleges and universities are taking a closer look at the level of career services support they are delivering to students beyond the learning experience. While much of this has to do with the current economy and the need for schools to continually find new and better ways to support students, the end goal for most institutions is regulatory compliance.

STATE OF THE INDUSTRY:

Government intervention in higher education coupled with a decline in jobs over the last few years is forcing colleges and universities to take on greater responsibility when it comes to supporting students through the career placement process. Keep in mind that:

  • Schools that can prove placement rates will be able to retain their student funding.
  • Schools that dedicate more resources to their career services department will have a greater opportunity to connect graduates with employers.
  • Schools that place more students in jobs can expect to see an increase in enrollment and retention as a result of their positive placement results.

Because of Gainful Employment, colleges and universities across the country are looking at career services in a whole new light and acknowledging its growing importance. However, many schools need assistance identifying where to best allocate resources in order to advance their career services support. Colleges and universities need to evaluate and consider the processes and systems that need to be put into place to help them overcome challenges, specifically with regards to management and reporting.

When it comes to career services management, schools need to ask themselves the following questions:

  1. Do we have the right processes in place to communicate with employers and students, as well as connect them and monitor their interaction?
  2. Do we have the data management practices in place that will allow students to proactively reach out to employers to market themselves?
  3. Do we have the data management practices in place that will allow us to create a comprehensive database of qualified candidates?
  4. Do we have the capabilities to allow employers to access student applicants and post open positions?

When it comes to career services reporting, schools need to ask themselves the following questions:

  1. Are we tracking the right Career Services Outcomes in terms of student and placement data?
  2. Can we easily access the data to pull the reports and analytics we need to prove placement and meet compliance?
  3. Do we have the ability to follow-up with alumni and track career results long term?

Colleges and universities need to implement the systems and processes that will allow them to increase placement rates and track the data for accreditation and federal regulatory purposes. Bringing software into the mix can make it easier to connect students and employers, creating greater efficiencies and stronger results. It can also facilitate reporting capabilities so schools can stay competitive and compliant. There are specific things that students, employers and schools need to do, and information they need to access in order to strengthen placement results.

STUDENT NEEDS:

It isn’t enough anymore to simply gain the skills necessary for job success, rather students need to be able to market themselves to employers. Colleges and universities need to provide a place and a process for students to do this.

Build an Online Profile– students need to be able to showcase their academic, personal and professional accomplishments in order to attract employers.

Attach a Cover Letter and Resume– students need to be able to upload and update attachments in order to communicate their career goals, experience and qualifications; they also need to be able to provide viewing access to potential employers.

Search Employer Profiles– students need access to the various employers who are hiring in their field so they can align their skill sets and goals with organizations for which they would like to work.

Search Job/Internship Postings– students need access to as much real world experience as possible in order to get their foot in the door with employers.

EMPLOYER NEEDS:

The shift in the job market has meant that employers have been able to be more selective in the hiring process. As we embark on an economic recovery, that may or may not continue. Regardless, employers also need to be able to market themselves, as well as search for and easily connect with qualified candidates.

Create Company Profile– employers need to be able to communicate their value proposition to future employees in terms of their business model, markets served, mission, culture and goals

Post Job Openings Online– employers need an efficient way to spread the word about job opportunities to a network of students and graduates who will most likely meet prerequisites.

View Student Background and Resume– employers need to be able to quickly and easily learn about and qualify prospective applicants.

Generate Resume Books– employers need to be able to compile resumes from qualified applicants in order to compare skill sets and achievements, and seek out the most appropriate candidate.

COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY NEEDS:

As colleges and universities take on greater accountability in job placement, they need to look for new ways to help students and graduates succeed beyond the classroom on a professional level. They can accomplish this by delivering a higher level of support throughout the education process. They also need to work closely with employers to make sure job candidates are meeting employer expectations, as well as connect these job seekers with their potential future employers.

When it comes to supporting students, schools need to do the following:

Track Student Information for Advising– career services advisors need a comprehensive tool set that enables them to track the student through the job search, assessing qualification and activities, as well as conducting follow-ups.

    • Integrated Academic and Demographic Information– advisors need a centralized place to access the student’s information, from grades to career goals so they can make sure the student is confident and capable in his or her chosen field, as well as on track to meet employer requirements.

    • Contact Management and Communication Tools– advisors need to be able to regularly reach out to students regarding such things as resume suggestions, new job postings and more.

  • Profile Background, Skill Sets and Preferences– advisors need to be able to easily compile a student’s information in order to identify career opportunities that would be a fit for the student.

Track Opportunities and Career Services Outcomes– career services advisors need an efficient way to stay on top of all postings so they can better match qualified students with job opportunities; they also need to manage and measure which postings secure hires.

Track Placement Information, Salary and Employment History– colleges need an easy way to analyze how many students are being placed, what they are earning, the success rate of each student once placed, and the career path each student follows out of school.

When it comes to engaging with employers, schools need to do the following:

Communicate with and Manage Potential Employers– colleges need a tool set that will enable them to build stronger employer relationships in order to better match students with jobs, as well as to secure the school’s reputation as a credible source of qualified graduates.

    • Track Multiple Locations and Contacts Per Employer– schools need to make sure they always have a current database of employers with which they can connect students.

    • Track Multiple Opportunity Types– advisors need to be able to analyze job details, such as full time, part time, hourly, internship, externship and more.

    • Contact Management– advisors need to be able to track current and past outreach with employers to see which relationships are in good standings and where additional outreach is necessary.

  • Communication Tools– advisors need to be able to proactively reach out to employers to reinforce the relationship and stay top of mind.

Track and Manage Job Requisitions– career services advisors need an easy way to follow existing and new job postings so they can match qualified applicants with those employers and opportunities.

Manage Alumni Network at the Employer– the career services team needs to be able to track and report on the number of students working with a specific organization so they can assess the success rates of graduates by employer, as well as determine organizations where their students’ skill sets are the best fit.

CONCLUSION:

Colleges and universities that advance their career services are going to be at an advantage. Their students will be better matched with career opportunities in which they have the chance to succeed, and the schools will be able to use the placement information to support compliance. A well thought out career services approach can mean more placements, which in turn can drive increased retention and stronger enrollment.

When looking at career services strategies, it is critical that schools simplify management processes and streamline reporting capabilities. A comprehensive student data management system that includes student and employer portals, as well as job seeker and employer CRMs can help colleges and universities do this by:

Self-Employed Careers

Self-employment is being employed by ones self. It identifies an individual who manages a company of her own or hires someone to oversee the day to day operations of your online business. Self-employed jobs are for those who don’t receive paid salary from another person or their company. The various kinds of self-employed jobs are: Sole proprietorship, Partnership, Companies.

The reason as to the reasons people choose self-employed jobs is lack of sustainable jobs. Lack of employment may drive one to begin his / her own small business thus being self-employed. One more reason we choose self-employment is flexibility. People will go for self-employed work opportunities so as to become free. Self-employed people do not rely on others for his or her living.

Increased wealth is yet another aspect in self-employment. Self-employed work offer men and women a possibility to increase their prosperity. Being your own personal boss enables one to decide how much money one makes in a month as opposed to salaried people who earn a standard salary monthly. Others create a part-time self employed job to bolster their income.

Why Men and women Prefer Self-Employed Job opportunities

With a self-employed job you decide your individual destiny. Employed persons do not get to choose what they want to do. You choose how much cash you desire and when you need it. Self-employed men and women earn what they desire. They can make more money by adding extra work or earn little money by putting in modest efforts.

Desire to do your dream work is actually a significant aspect in self-employed employment. It enables individuals to discover their aspirations they always imagined. Your passion for individual time is yet another reason. Self-employed men and women manage their own individual time how they like. You’ve got time for close friends and family. Some men and women want recognition. Company owners lovethe recognition that accompanies powerful businesses. They may have their names showing up on merchandise, buildings, and vehicles.

Advantages of Self Employment

Benefits connected with self-employment consist of joining all revenue coming from their businesses. Self-employed people are their own bosses and with that they do not receive orders from anyone. Self-employed individuals organize his or her time.

Job security can be another reason you desire to be self-employed. Once you get set up, you can work as many hours as you would like. Self-employed jobs allow anyone to do what you like accomplishing at your speed so long as you love your job. Furthermore, it allows someone to be inventive and enables one to use their own imagination as they like.

Creating a self-employed job enables anyone to work from the comfort of your house and can set up your work area as you like. Stay at home moms can be excellent candidates for self-employment. They are able to start out part-time and grow it as quickly or as slow as they want.

Disadvantages of Self-Employed Careers

There’s a greater risk of losing funds invested if the company falls flat. When you start off full-time, small business owners do the job for long hours. A number of people say there’s alack of professionalism in self-employment particularly with smaller businesses. Although you can control just how much you make, another drawback is when work gets sluggish without proper preparation, money reduces.

Factors to Keep in mind With Self-Employment

In order to generate profits, you should put in great effort in owning a business. Be determined to get out of bed early and propel yourself to achieve more. You need to be in charge of all of your actions and outcomes that can come. Master book keeping and record keeping.

Acquiring control of finances is very important. Finally, Market yourself along with your business by networking both on the web and off. Being generally known as reputable as well as a hard worker can bring in clients which you normally would not expect to obtain.

New Penalties for Employing Illegal

Migration Amendment (Reform of Employer Sanctions) Act 2013 and the Migration Amendment Regulation 2013 (No. 3) came into effect.

The Act introduces new civil penalties for Australian employers that employ workers from overseas who are not allowed to work, or employ overseas workers in breach of work-related visa conditions.

Under the new laws, employers are liable even if they do not know that a worker is not allowed to work or has work-related visa conditions.

Employers may also be liable even if the illegal worker was referred to them by an employment agency.

Executive officers of companies (directors, secretaries, CEOs and CFOs) may also be liable if they do not take all reasonable steps to prevent the company from employing illegal workers.

However, if employers can prove that they took “reasonable steps at reasonable times” to verify that their workers are allowed to work in Australia without breaching their visa conditions, they will not be liable.

Employing non-Australian workers – the basics

Australian citizens and New Zealand citizens who live in Australia are allowed to work in Australia.

People from other countries need to hold a visa to legally enter or remain in Australia.

Some visas do not allow the visa holder to work at all. Other visas have work-related conditions that restrict the type or amount of work the visa holder can do.

Offences

It is illegal to allow a non-citizen who does not hold a visa to work.

It is illegal to allow a non-citizen who holds a visa to work in breach of a work-related condition of their visa.

It is illegal to refer a non-citizen for work if they do not hold a visa or if it breaches a work-related condition of their visa.

Employers who are visa sponsors have additional obligations that are not dealt with in this article. It is an offence to breach those sponsorship obligations.

Penalties and fines for employers

The new civil penalties for employers range from $1,530 for individuals and $7,650 for companies for a first infringement notice to a maximum civil penalty of $15,300 for individuals and $76,500 for companies.

There are also criminal penalties including imprisonment and substantial fines for employers who knew, or were reckless as to whether the worker was not allowed to work or had work restrictions.

Required checks

The new laws require Australian employers to take “reasonable steps at reasonable times” to verify that their workers are allowed to work in Australia without breaching their visa conditions.

Australian citizens, permanent residents or New Zealand citizens

Before employing workers who claim to be Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents or New Zealand citizens, employers should inspect official documents that verify the worker’s citizenship status.

Workers from overseas

Before employing overseas workers, employers should check their visa details AND work-related visa conditions on the Department of Immigration and Citizenship’s Visa Entitlement and Verification Online (VEVO) computer system.

Temporary visas – employers should note the visa expiry date of workers who hold temporary visas and check VEVO again immediately after that date to ensure the workers have been granted a new visa and check for any work-related visa conditions.

Bridging visas are short-term visas with no fixed expiry date usually granted while the visa holder awaits the outcome of a visa application. Employers should check VEVO regularly to ensure that workers who hold bridging visas continue to hold a visa and check for any work-related visa conditions.

Workers referred by contractors or labour hire companies

On 1 June 2013 the Migration Amendment (Reform of Employer Sanctions) Act 2013 and the Migration Amendment Regulation 2013 (No. 3) came into effect.

The Act introduces new civil penalties for Australian employers that employ
workers from overseas who are not allowed to work, or employ overseas workers in breach of work-related visa conditions.

Before employing workers referred by a third party, employers should get written verification that they are allowed to work in Australia and whether they have any work-related visa conditions.

Recordkeeping

The onus is on employers to prove that they took reasonable steps to verify that their workers are allowed to work in Australia without breaching their visa conditions.

It is therefore vital that employers keep records of all checks that they do including the dates they do them and to keep copies of any related documents such as passports that they inspect.

Duties of executive officers

Executive officers of companies should take all reasonable steps to ensure the company complies with all laws relating to employing non-Australian workers.

All of the company’s employees, agents and contractors who are from overseas or who are involved in hiring, rostering or supervising employees from overseas should be given any necessary training to ensure that the company does not employ overseas workers in breach of work-related visa conditions.

Small Employer Worksite Wellness

Small employers need worksite wellness programs too. As a small employer, you care about and want healthy employees don’t you?

Wellness programs have traditionally been the province of the large employer, basically leaving the smaller employer out of today’s explosion in employee health management.

This is unfortunate as the small employer needs wellness programming just as much as the large employer. Small employers make up the majority of US employers and employ a large percentage of today’s workforce. I am defining small employer as being an employer with less than 100 employees.

Traditionally within worksite wellness, each employer creates, for the most part, their own internal, stand-alone program utilizing internal employer based resources, or the resources provided by a contracted vendor, such as the health insurance company or a wellness program vendor. This independent, self-sufficient model is not, in my opinion, either viable nor the best strategy for the small employer to employ.

There is certainly no reason why a small employer cannot, on their own, create their own internal, stand-alone program utilizing internal employer based resources, or the resources provided by a contracted vendor, such as the health insurance company or wellness program vendor.

Another strategy a smaller employer might be to still go it alone by putting together programming based on free or low-cost Internet-based interventions. This strategy, while maybe being a low-cost strategy in terms of dollars actually spent, is a high cost strategy in terms of the time and energy required to put all the various interventions together into a cogent implementation plan and then executing the plan. The smaller employer would probably find this time and energy to be better used though elsewhere in the business.

Five alternative worksite wellness program models a small employer might utilize involve cooperation, collaboration, anchor model, cluster program model and an employer – community partnership model.

Cooperative Model

In the cooperative model, small employers would band together to deliver a wellness program to their collective employees through some type of cooperative agreement. Each employer makes a contribution in the cooperative model, with the nature and size of the contribution potentially varying with each employer. While potentially better than going it alone, the cooperative model presents challenges such as:

• The collective contributions may still fall short of what is needed for the cooperative to institute a successful program on its own

• A cooperative approach would not address any unique needs an individual employer may have based on the uniqueness of their workforce or work environments

• An employer would not necessarily bring its strengths to the cooperative process. What is lost when an individual employer’s strengths are not utilized in the process?

Collaborative Model

In the collaborative model, small employers also band together to deliver a wellness program to their collective employees through some type of collaborative agreement. Through a collaborative arrangement, each employer contributes their strengths to the process. While potentially better than going it alone and a cooperative agreement, the collaborative model also presents such challenges as:

• The collective contributions may still fall short of what is needed for the collaborative members to institute a successful program on their own

• A collaborative approach would also not address any unique needs an individual employer may have

Anchor Model

The anchor model is based on the anchor store concept found in shopping malls. In this model, a larger employer serves as the anchor for a wellness program that includes both the anchor company and the anchor employer’s nearby smaller employers. I see this model as being best suited for a shopping center, or an industrial or commercial park.

Cluster Model

The cluster model could involve either a cooperative or collaborative arrangement between neighboring businesses. I see this model as being best suited for a main street or designated section of a downtown.

Employer – Community Partnership Model

I believe this is a much better model for the small employer to undertake. In this model, the level of employer linkage to community based resources and programs decreases as the employer grows in employee size.

Rescinding Of A Determined Employment

With the right to employment comes another essential related right which is the right to choice of one’s employment. The right to choice of one’s employment gives the freedom to people to undertake work of their own choice and not toil in the field in which they do not wish to put their labor. Laboring against the will of one’s self can be considered to be forced labor which is illegal in UAE and most of the other countries in the world. Employment contract is an agreement between the employer and the employee where the employee agrees to work for the employer for a fixed period of time and for a specific job – role. Employment contracts sometimes do not fix the duration of employment in which case the contract is known as an undetermined contract whereas determined employment contracts are contracts that bind the employee to the employer for a fixed period of time. Employment contracts are not considered as forms of forced labor as both the employee and employer willingly enter into it but in the long run it may be considered as forced labor as the main aim to fix a duration is to ensure that the employee does not leave the employment before that duration even if he wishes to and therefore once the employee signs an employment contract he has to work for the employer for the number of years fixed by the employment contract and the employee loses his right to leave quit the employment before that period. Though this is not considered forced labor it is in reality a different form of forced labor behind the veil of an enforceable contract.

In the United Arab Emirates the right to employment and all related rights enumerated in its rich constitution is only limited to the nationals of the United Arab Emirates whereas the rest of the people who live here as expatriates have to solely depend on employment contracts and therefore become the victims of the veiled forced labor. The present article discusses the regulations enumerated in the labor law1 for ending the employment and the consequences of breach of employment contracts of fixed duration.

According to the labor of the UAE the employer may on grounds enumerated in article 120 of the federal law no.8 of 1980, rescind the employment contract without giving notice. The grounds enumerated for rescinding of the employment without notice are as under:

1. In case the worker assumes a false identity or nationality, or submits false certificates or documents.

2. In case the worker had been appointed under probation, and the dismissal had taken place during or at the end of the probation period.

3. In case the worker commits an error resulting in colossal material losses to the employer. In such cases the Labor Department should be notified of the incident within 48 hours of the knowledge of the occurrence thereof.

4. In case the worker violates the instructions related to the safety at work or in the work place, provided that such instructions were written and posted in a prominent location, and that the said worker is notified thereof if he be an illiterate.

5. In case the worker fails to perform his main duties in accordance with the employment contract, and thereafter fails to remedy such failure despite a written investigation on the matter and a warning that he would be dismissed in case of recidivism.

6. In case the worker divulges any of the secret of the establishment where he works.

7. In case the worker convicted in a final manner by the competent court in a crime relating to honor, honesty or public ethics.

8. In case the worker is found in a state of drunkenness or under the influence of a narcotic during work hours.

9. In case the worker assaults the employer, responsible manager or co – worker during the work hours.

10. In case the worker remains absent without valid cause for more than twenty non – consecutive days in one year, or for more than seven consecutive days.

In case none of the above circumstances described applies to a case yet the employer terminates the employment of the worker without notice before the expiration of the determined employment contract, the employer has to provide compensation to the employee for the same. The compensation amount that is provided to the worker by the employer is in lieu of the damages suffered by the worker due to the premature termination of the employment. The law provides for a limitation to the amount of compensation which is limited to the total wage due for the period of three months or for the remaining period of the contract, whichever is shorter, unless otherwise stipulated in the contract. Therefore this provision is subject to the terms of the contract. Many times the contract has liquidated damages fixed for specific breaches; in such cases the damages awarded do not exceed nor are less than the liquidated amount.

Similar provisions are also provided in case the worker decides to leave the employment before the expiration of the employment contract. The worker may leave the employment before the expiration of the contract without notice if the following circumstances prevail:

1. In case the employer breaches his obligations towards the worker, as set forth in the contract or the law.

2. In case the employer or the legal representative thereof assaults the worker.

In case the two circumstances mentioned above do not prevail and yet the worker leave the employment prior to the expiry of the employment contract, the worker is be bound to compensate the employer for the loss incurred by him due to the rescission of the contract. The compensation amount is limited by the law to not exceed the wage of half a month for the period of three months, or for the remaining period of the contract, whichever is shorter, unless otherwise stipulated in the contract. Thus here too the terms of the contract if any regarding this matter shall be made applicable in a manner similar as it is explained above regarding termination of employment contract by employer.

These provisions mentioned above hold good only to the citizens of UAE, for the rest of 88% of the population the provision stipulated in article 128 of the law2 applies. Article 128 provides that in the event of a non – national worker to leave his work without a valid cause prior to the end of the contract with definite term, he may not get another employment even with the permission of the employer for a year from the date of abandonment of the work. It further provides for a warning for the employers that they may never knowingly recruit the worker or retain in his service during such period. The Non – national workers may be exempt from such penalties if they can secure an authorization of the original employer and after submitting such authorization in the ministry of labor and social affairs, attain the consent of the ministry for the new employment.